HealthInvestor Asia Summit 2018
Financial intelligence for Asia's healthcare markets
 
 
Remember me:

Analysis: How digital can generate value

Mitch Beaumont, Prashanth Prasad, Ulrica Sehlstedt and Mandeep Dhillon from international management consultants Arthur D. Little explain how medical technology companies can manage going digital.

Within the Asian healthcare sector, both existing players and new entrants can create significant value with digital products and services. For established analogue-native medical technology companies, however, going digital will require significant business and operational model changes, which can be daunting. Nevertheless, executives can proactively manage these changes and their impact by considering a set of levers that they can control.

We have identified two sets of primary levers that executives can use to impact the changes to their companies’ business and operational models that are necessary to support a digital business. The specific levers used, and the degree to which they are pulled, will be unique to each company’s environment and its ultimate goals for digital. Most medical technology companies will focus more on two or three levers, with minor changes in the others. First there are business model levers:

•            Value proposition. Digital products and services can enhance or shift a medical technology company’s value proposition in the market. Or it can offer tools such as applications and reminders to increase patient engagement and improve adherence. Typically, a digital business will want to build upon the company’s existing core value proposition, rather than creating a completely new one.

•            Value extraction. Most medical technology companies have focused on selling devices, or generating revenue per unit. However, monetisation of value can take on alternative forms with digital, such as service-oriented models and data-centric models.

•            Markets served. Digital can enable a company to shift or expand the markets it serves to open up new business opportunities. Alternatively, companies may be able to create new business relationships with other value-chain players, such as home health companies, by providing information that improves the effectiveness and efficiency of in-home care delivery.

Second, there are operating model levers:

•            Process/methods. Going digital requires new ways of working. Software development cycle times are faster, and will be more effectively enabled by agile methods, which are fundamentally different from existing linear or phase-gate approaches employed by most medical technology companies. Robust technology and portfolio management methods are needed to keep up with the faster pace of technology change and ensure r&d resources are invested in the right areas.

•            Delivery network. Becoming digital can create opportunities for medical technology companies to engage with a broader ecosystem to develop offers and reach the market. The complexity and system-like nature of many digital-centric solutions creates attractive opportunities to engage development and/or delivery partners.

•            Capabilities/footprint. Adding digital elements to a portfolio will require new capabilities in areas such as application development, data management and security. In addition, medical technology companies will require capabilities in areas such as consumer insight and behavioural economics to ensure their digital-health solutions meet patient/user needs and expectations.

A more significant change in each group of levers collectively creates an overall more significant change along the respective dimension.  Companies can use this visualisation to qualitatively assess the degree of change – and change management – they will need to make to support a digital strategy and transformation.

There is a clear set of initial steps an established get started on a digital transformation, or for organisations that have dabbled in deploying digital services, ensuring strategic alignment between what the market needs and what the company does.

First and foremost, begin by taking the time to understand the needs of your customers or users; avoid making assumptions – talk to them to learn about their experiences. Next, carefully screen to determine which needs can actually be addressed by digital; in addition, screen for those needs that it makes sense for the company to address. Then evaluate solution concepts to identify the business model and operational model changes that will need to occur to implement digital. And finally, with an understanding of the implications to the business model and operating model, set a strategy and develop a plan for going digital.

There is significant value to be captured with digital products and services in the healthcare industry. Many new entrants are well positioned to compete because their models are oriented towards software development – more so than existing, analog-native medical technology companies, which are organised to comply with regulations. For these companies, going digital will require significant business- and operational-model changes. Executives can proactively manage these changes and their impact by considering our recommended set of levers.

Posted on: 16/01/2018 UTC+08:00


News

Bumrungrad Hospital, Thailand’s second-largest listed hospital operator, has reported an 8.8% rise in annual profits to Bt3.9 billion (US$124.8 million) on revenues that 2.2% to Bt18.5 billion.
Half year profits at nursing staffing provider Bamboos Health Care Holdings jumped thanks to the increase in demand for services from both institutional and individual clients and, in particular, from hospitals for its placement service.
Singapore-listed investment holding company New Silkroutes Group (NSG) is to raise S$5 million (US$3.8 million) in a private placement. Proceeds will be used to develop healthcare education and training opportunities.
Al-‘Aqar Healthcare REIT, a subsidiary of KPJ Healthcare, has reported a 33.4% rise in profits for the year to M$84.6 million (US$21.6 million) on revenues that rose 19% to M$120.3 million. The increase in profits was mainly due to higher fair value gains on investment properties and lower financing cost following the redemption of an unrated M$80 million Sukuk in July last year.
Solid H1 figures and a steady outlook for the rest of the year saw shares in aged care operator Estia Heath jump almost 6% yesterday.
Parkway Life REIT, which is owned by IHH Healthcare, has paid up for yen funding, though with the possibility of US interest rate hikes, the move is a canny way of hedging forex exposure.
For the second time in seven months, RHT Health Trust, the first business trust listed on the Singapore stock exchange with a portfolio comprising healthcare assets in India, has flagged up an event of default on its S$120 million (US$88 million) 4.5% bonds due in July.
SGX-listed TalkMed Group, a provider of medical oncology and palliative care health care services, has reported a 15.4% decline in annual profits to S$36.9 million (US$27.9 million) on revenues that fell 11% to S$61.4 million.



Analysis

Nicole Hill, global director of healthcare at ALE, has a goal to make everyone and everything in healthcare connected. She explains how healthcare is entering a second wave of digitisation in Asia.
There is a simple reason why healthcare stocks on the SGX rose today. Yesterday’s budget was focused firmly on healthcare. Finance minister Heng Swee Keat announced not just an additional S$10.2 billion (US$7.8 million) for healthcare over the next year, he made clear that he was committed to the sector.
A new paper from KPMG looks at the disconnect between consumer expectations and the current healthcare experience of patients in Australia.
Gan Kim Yong, Singapore’s minister for health, explains why integrated care is important in the context of an ageing population.
Not having featured before 2015, Chinese investment in Australia’s healthcare sector has surged over the past three years. It has reached A$5.5 billion (US$4.5 billion) across 16 completed deals, according to a new report from KPMG and The University of Sydney Business School.
Michael Griffiths, regional director of healthcare at specialist insurance brokers Howden, explains how insurance is an answer to the region’s healthcare crisis.
Nomaan Mirza, principal equity specialist at the International Finance Corporation, looks at healthcare equity opportunities in emerging markets.
The healthcare industry in Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at 11.1% in 2018, representing one of the fastest growing regions in the world, as the global healthcare economy averages a 4.8% annual growth rate.
my images

Podcasts

Hedge Fund Focus

HealthInvestor Asia twitter feed
HIA Indices